Hi,

> On Mar 5, 2004, at 8:03 PM, Tim Bates wrote:
>> Phil Tomson wrote:
>>> But I didn't find them in there... Which makes me wonder if it's even
>>> possible to output them this way.  I know that to get them in HTML 
>>> you
>>> use ® and ™
>>
>> `puts 174.chr` gives me a little (R) symbol that's rather difficult 
>> to read, and `puts 153.chr` gives me a dotted square - so I guess it 
>> depends on what terminal font you're using. I assume you're wanting 
>> to do this in a terminal window? The answer probably is that there's 
>> no guaranteed portable way to do it except for "(R)" and "(TM)".

It looks like a character encoding issue... When I set my terminal to 
use the "Western (Windows Latin 1)" encoding, I can do this:
    >> 174.chr.display
   ?=> nil
    >> 153.chr.display
   ?=> nil
But with it set to unicode (the way I usually have it), it give nice 
little question marks instead of characters. I think Tim is right, in 
the terminal, you may want to use (R) and (TM). If you are using it in 
a cgi script, though, just set the character encoding correctly and you 
should be okay.

On Mar 5, 2004, at 7:56 PM, Gavin Kistner wrote:
> Vaguely related (and important for everyone to read, IMO):
>
> "The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively 
> Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!)"
> http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/Unicode.html

Hey! great link! I'd been meaning to read up more on unicode, but 
hadn't found enough information in one place... I read the first bit, 
and it looks good (and it's not too dry, either).

--Mark