>> Well, you need apps. We don't have applications. If you look at RAA or
>> RubyForge you may see lots of frameworks, libraries, but little apps.

My framework for computer vision at work (proprietary, can't share, sorry)
is done in such a way that the application is too small to be of any
interest (may be we are philosophers, may be we are just too experienced
to shove applications onto others, which are of no use to them as
programmer; doesn't this clash with the ruby-as-prototyping language point
of view? that's proto-apps, definitely, proto-libs, maybe...).

On a sidenote, I found one more advantage of programming in Ruby at work:
people will not abuse my research/experimenting code as real product code
(which tends to happen with C, C++ and Java). The reason: noone knows the
language, so they are certainly not going to learn it to put it in some
product. Even though some of my code has been running stable for months.

Btw: as long as I experience SEGFAULTS with Ruby, usually within
hours, Ruby is not ready for certain kinds of work. Ruby 1.8.1 seems to
have taken away my SEGFAULTS, but you'll have to do a bit more than that
to convince me Ruby is completely safe.

But, I gladly take these minor disadvantages with the major advantages
Ruby offers.

+--- Kero ----------------------- kero@chello@nl ---+
|  all the meaningless and empty words I spoke      |
|                      Promises -- The Cranberries  |
+--- M38c --- http://httpd.chello.nl/k.vangelder ---+