On Friday, 16 January 2004 at 11:21:40 +0900, Nathaniel Talbott wrote:
> On Jan 15, 2004, at 20:16, Jim Freeze wrote:
> 
> It's not really subversive... basically, it just allows the server to 
> call back to clients that are behind firewalls. So the client can pass 
> the server a proxied (DRbUndumped) object, and at some later time, the 
> server can call a method on that object and have that method call 
> relayed back to the client. Normally this is done via the server 
> initiating the connection, but if the client is behind a firewall (or 
> NAT), that doesn't work. So we have the client initiate connections to 
> the server that the server then uses for calling back to the client.
> 
> Does that make more sense?
 
I think so. How about this example:

        |
  [A]   |      [B]
work    |      home
      firewall   

Let's say I have two machines, one work machine
behind a firewall and a home machine. I cannot
connect to A from B because of the firewall, but
I can connect from A to B. So, while at work, I
make a connection to B. Then when I get home, I
assume there is a way that I can call back into
A with that open connection. Is this correct?
If so, what type of calls can I make back to A.
I am limited to ruby code through drb?
Could I ever get an ssh open from B to A?


-- 
Jim Freeze
----------
Langsam's Laws:
	(1) Everything depends.
	(2) Nothing is always.
	(3) Everything is sometimes.