T. Onoma wrote:
> Do me a favor and build you own 128bit timestamp and lets be done with these 
> restraints.  I'm getting shades of Y2K mainia all over again. ;)

With 64bit you are quite free to do ranges from thousands of BC to 
hundreds of thousands AD with subsecond precision. You don't really need 
128bit unless you're doing something like atomic-level time scales (e.g. 
picosecond precision) or something like GUID.

But if you want a 128bit timestamp, there's already DJB's libtai:

  http://cr.yp.to/libtai.html


> On Sunday 23 November 2003 02:29 pm, David Garamond wrote:
> 
>>I'm looking for a 64bit timestamp definition/standard with suitable
>>range (at least from year 1900 to 2100) and precision (at least
>>milliseconds). So far .NET's System.DateTime is the best candidate
>>(range is year 1 AD to 9999 AD, precision is 0.1 microsecond). However,
>>conversion to/from UNIX timestamp looks to be non-straightforward. Is
>>there a Ruby library to do this (or to/from other suitable timestamp)?
>>
>>I could always invent my own timestamp, but...

-- 
dave