On Nov 18, 2003, at 7:13 AM, Nikolai Weibull wrote:

> it's a template, and the template uses a stylesheet.  the thing is that
> no h1's or h2's are being used, rather tables and classes are used to
> set text properties - which is of course bad, but that's the way the
> template works at the moment...

I think you're confused. The template I created *does* use h1 and h2 
(IMO correctly), and only uses tables for tabular data, preferring 
<div> for most things. The stylesheet doesn't (as suggested in a 
previous post) even have .{big,small}-title-font classes, nor do the h1 
or h2 elements set the font size to 'large' or pixel-sizes. The h1 
element is set to "120%" in the default stylesheet, but I try to avoid 
absolute pixel-sizes whenever possible when targeting many browsers.

Responding to the general thread:

I have no idea why an element whose font-size is set to "120%" would 
render smaller than a default h2. I've tested it in Mozilla, IE, and 
Safari on MacOSX, and Mozilla and Konqueror in Linux. Suggestions about 
how to eliminate this problem welcomed.

The aesthetics of it are of course subject to debate, but that's the 
nature of aesthetics. I dislike the classic underline, especially in a 
page that's so link-heavy, but there's certainly a case to be made for 
making links look like people expect them to look.

Soon after I submitted the 'css2' template, I also submitted (and Dave 
accepted) a patch that allows you to set your own custom stylesheet, 
which I think is a better solution than debating the aesthetic merits 
of the default stylesheet anyway. This allows you to use the css2 (or 
any other)
template, but provide a stylesheet which reflects your own particular 
tastes.

--
Michael Granger <ged / FaerieMUD.org>
Rubymage, Believer, Architect
The FaerieMUD Consortium <http://www.FaerieMUD.org/>