On Thursday 23 Oct 2003 9:49 pm, Ben Giddings wrote:
>
> Cool, now when you say "build me a new distro", that will typically include
> a bootloader, a window manager (Gnome or KDE), a default shell, a web
> browser, an editor, and a bunch of other things.  Do you get to choose
> them?  What are the defaults and what others are supported?

I'll answer for x86; x86-64 should be similar when complete

Yes. Grub is included. Lilo would take minutes to add
Kde works fine; Gnome used to work, but needs some attention atm
I just use Konqueror; Have had mozilla working but needs bringing upto date.
Shell is bash. Xemacs and Vim included. I can add any other editor you care to 
mention in a few minutes - thats the beauty of rubyx.

You have compile control of the packages you build into your distro, including 
(supported) versions if you don't want the default
>
> Also, if you're cross compiling the distro, what format are the outputs in?
>    (straight binaries, tarballs, another binary package, ...) Also, how

Rubyx builds a native distro to your specification into a specified dir or 
partition, from source.

For x86-64 on a machine running a 64bit kernel but 32bit userspace, rubyx 
builds a cross-compile toolchain, uses that to build native toolchain and 
fundamental packages, chroots and builds everything else from a pure 64bit 
environment. I have Lots of build issues with lots of packages right now, but 
am making good headway (with x86-64)

> easy is it to make a live CD, or an install CD?

Dunno; never done it. I always build straight into a partition using an 
existing linux installation, or build the distro on another machine and boot 
the new pc with a rescue cd like bbc, then scp it over.

Live cd should be real easy to do though.

>
> Could someone who knows both give a bullet-point summary of the differences
> between Rubyx and Lunar Linux?
>
I doubt it, since I'm the only person using rubyx, and I haven't tried lunar 
yet ;)

Andrew