As in "the proof of the pudding is in the eating".
-- 
Phil Wilson [MVP Windows Installer]
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"Gary P" <askme / newsgroup> wrote in message
news:OiLMxv2gDHA.2400 / TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> "Mark Wallace" <mwallace / dse.nl> wrote in message
> news:bkueqd$5vv80$1 / ID-51325.news.uni-berlin.de...
> > Anthony Neville wrote:
> > >> "Suhaimi" <pdfwenlpx / vmb.com> wrote in message
> > >> news:bku9nl$q6h$1 / mawar.singnet.com.sg...
> > >  > Microsoft   All Products |  Support |  Search |  Microsoft.com
> > > Guide [...]
> > >
> > > Grow up little nerdy boy.  Infecting people's machines is so passÚČ
> > > so why not
> > > do something productive like invade North Korea.
> >
> > I like the way his translator program or web-site has given "prove" for
> > "test".  *So* cute.  You could just snuggle him up, before wringing his
> > scrawny neck.
>
> It's not wrong though.
>
> He's a dick, but "prove" does mean test.
>
> From Merriam Webster
>
> Main Entry: prove
> Pronunciation: 'pr
> Function: verb
> Inflected Form(s): proved; proved or provn  /'prv&n, British also
> 'prO-/; provng  /'prvi[ng]/
> Etymology: Middle English, from Old French prover, from Latin probare to
> test, approve, prove, from probus good, honest, from pro- for, in favor
> + -bus (akin to Old English bEon to be) -- more at PRO-, BE
> Date: 13th century
> transitive senses
> 1 archaic : to learn or find out by experience
> 2 a : to test the truth, validity, or genuineness of <the exception proves
> the rule> <prove a will at probate> b : to test the worth or quality of;
> specifically : to compare against a standard -- sometimes used with up or
> out c : to check the correctness of (as an arithmetic result)
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