Berger, Daniel wrote:
> 
>>-----Original Message-----
>>From: Sean O'Dell [mailto:sean / cSePlsoAfMt.com[REMOVE_THE_SPAM]] 
>>Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2003 3:54 PM
>>To: ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org
>>Subject: Re: backup under privileged mode (unix permissions)
>>
>>
>>Simon Strandgaard wrote:
>>
>>>I have some data which I make a backup of on daily basis.
>>>The data has many different owners/groups.
>>>
>>>I have writen some Ruby which does the job (when logged in 
>>
>>as root). I 
>>
>>>don't like running things as root, so I have created a dedicated 
>>>account only for backup, under which the backup script is 
>>
>>supposed to 
>>
>>>be executed.
>>>
>>>Unfortunatly I cannot figure out the last part (running the ruby 
>>>script with root read-permissions).
>>>
>>>Q1: How should I setup the right permissions (setuid, 
>>
>>/etc/group), any 
>>
>>>ideas ?
>>>Q2: How do you execute your backup scripts with the right 
>>
>>permissions ?
>>
>>It gets complicated (I've been there), and sometimes you just have to 
>>say "hey, that's what root is for."
>>
>>Assuming your backup script isn't executing anything else through the 
>>"system" method and such, you probably can't make much use out of 
>>playing with the real/effective user id's.  Your problem is probably 
>>strictly that you need permission to read the files you need 
>>backed up.
>>
>>First thought: run it as root.  IMO, that's one of the few 
>>things root 
>>is really there for.
>>
>>A slightly less "certain" method would be to make your backup user a 
>>member of every group who might own files you want to back 
>>up.  You do 
>>this by editing the /etc/group file so that each group you 
>>want to add 
>>backup to looks something like this:
>>
>>     groupname:x:user,backup
>>
>>.... then the backup user will have group permissions for every file 
>>whose group is one of those groups.  Unfortunately, if the file is 
>>readable by the user, but not by the group the file is owned by, your 
>>backup script will still not be able to read the file.
>>
>>So, back to square one: run it as root.  =)
>>
>>	Sean O'Dell
> 
> 
> There's always 'sudo'.

What problem is that a solution for?

	Sean O'Dell