Oliver Dain <odain2 / nospam.mindspring.com> wrote:
> 
> The above code is, I think, interpreted completely differently that 
> the "if (3==3)..(3==3)" code.  Why?  The latter is a boolean range 
> while the former first creates a range object and then applied 
> operator === to that.  Things like 'print if /foo/../bar/' operate 
> differently than other types of ranges because they're boolean 
> ranges.  For example you might think

Sorry about the confusion - I was agreeing with your point about how it
*should* work.

martin