We make our new hires give a brief presentaion on some technology as part 
of the interview process. In our last hiring binge we used AOP as the 
principle topic. It lets us see the communication skills of the prospect 
and it also allows us a glimpse into areas none of us have time to pursue.

AOP was very difficult to explain, debug and implement. It did not 
obviously replace any of our current procedures and at best it was 
perceived as very heavy-weight. The conclusion on AOP was that it was a 
neat concept but there was no immediate benefit for using it.

Since then I have seen a couple of articles in Software Development 
Magazine (online version) suggesting that AOP is no longer as "cool" as it 
used to be. With OOP it is fairly obvious that it reduces the complexity of 
the software process and if used correctly it is fairly easy to explain. 
With AOP there is no single, simple overview of the technology.

On Sat, 23 Aug 2003 22:00:22 +0900, Lothar Scholz <llothar / web.de> wrote:

>> Aspect oriented Software development seems to be expanding in the
>> popular vision of developers, with more and more IDE 'add-ons' and
>> even more specialized tools,Jboss etc.
>
> I'm not sure if this is a the way to go. I've only seen proof of
> concept but no real use. But only in the latter case you can see the
> problems.
>
> I don't like it because it breaks encapsulation and splitters the code
> over a few files. Maybe that can be solved with new kind of editors
> but it is much more easy to result in a big confusion.
>
> The most important use cases that i've seen so far are:
>
> - Logging facilities
> - Debugging code
> - Pre/Postconditions
> - Threading synchronization
>
> 1+2+3 can be embedded in a language. This is already done in Eiffel.
> I don't know if i really want to see something as difficult as
> "threading synchronization" as an aspect.
>
>



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