Gavin Sinclair wrote:
> On Wednesday, August 20, 2003, 10:28:21 PM, Brandon wrote:
>
>> In the future, I think such suggestions would be more effective if
>> you include a URL to a specific, relevant post.

You will notice that the above is a true, diplomatically nuanced statement,
regardless of your opinion below.

>>When someone first
>> mentioned ruby-talk, they mentioned it as though everyone already
>> knew what it was.  I didn't; I assumed it was some chat channel
>> somewhere and I wasn't going to delve into that sort of thing.
>
> That's because, contrary to common guidelines of Usenet etiquette -
> which you'll no doubt declare are of no interest to you personally
> right now - you have not spent any time lurking to get the feel of the
> group.

I don't believe in lurking "to get the feel," and never have.  It is a
luxury for people with all the time in the world.  It's also a form of
submissiveness (shut up, don't speak until you know the ropes) that I don't
expect out of children, adults, or basically anybody.  Proper community
behavior is tolerance for and information sharing with newcomers.  Nobody,
IMHO, should be busting a newcomer's chops about whether they've read all
the FAQs or not.  Pointing at info that's available in FAQs is quite ok.
That's what they're there for.  I only feel more strongly about these things
now that Usenet isn't an academic backwater.  We passed the point of
newsgroups being identical to cozy little mailing lists with uniform, rigid
community standards a *long* time ago.

>  If you did, you would see a regularly-published comp.lang.ruby
> FAQ, containing posting guidelines and links to resources, like
> www.ruby-talk.org.  Of course, you could have looked at
> www.ruby-lang.org as well.  Not too hard, is it?

I *did* look at www.ruby-lang.org before coming here.  I *read* a FAQ about
Ruby.  And the Python people confirmed that it was out of date.  Which put
my interest in your local FAQ process at zero.  This is yet another reason I
don't believe in FAQ culture.  They are never up to date.  Nobody has the
time.  This is 2003.  Things to do.  Places to be.  Code to churn.  I could
not possibly be bothered to know every detail of your FAQs, in advance of
all this discussion, that I might recall www.ruby-talk.org from memory to
save someone's precious bandwidth.  If I hadn't missed that detail, I would
surely have missed something else.  Which surely would have elicited a "Well
why didn't you lurk awhile?" post from someone else.

-- 
Cheers,                         www.3DProgrammer.com
Brandon Van Every               Seattle, WA

"Troll" - (n.) Anything you don't like.
Usage: "He's just a troll."