I can't quite match the subject line in practice, because inevitably I'm
only going to ask questions of subjective interest to me.

Martin DeMello wrote:
> Brandon J. Van Every <vanevery / 3dprogrammer.com> wrote:
>
>> I'll turn the question back to you.  Are you personally willing to
>> assess the pros and cons of Ruby objectively?  Although you may have
>> already answered, since you said you're tired of the talking.
>
> Here's an idea - why not post a series of "how do I do #{foo} in
> ruby?" questions, and let the answers show you if it's a language
> you'd enjoy working in?

It's a good suggestion, in general.  Truthfully though, I am not the kind of
person who makes language decisions on this basis.  I don't "enjoy"
languages or "play" with them.  I consider all languages to be In The Way
[TM].  With the possible exception of English, which I'm pretty fluent and
verbose with.  For the most part I dislike programming, it is the results of
programming that I value.  Even then, I do not value any old program, they
need to achieve certain things.  Like Art.  Or Entertainment.

From what I've read, and what people have said, I suspect that the Ruby
community has a huge contingent of people who simply enjoy tinkering with
Ruby.  They are awash in its expressive power.  This is probably great for
them, but I'm not at all convinced it's relevant to me.  I've never
programmed anything "truly exotic" in my life.  Everything I've ever done
has been pretty low level ASM grunge.  Even if it hasn't been ASM, it's been
over-optimized.  I'm tired of it, that's why I'm looking around for a
different paradigm.  But I think it's probably going to be awhile before I
know or care what the difference between dynamism in Python and Ruby is.
Maybe I'll figure out how C# is deficient sooner, but even there I have my
doubts.

So what do I need to know about Ruby that I haven't learned already?  Well,
I'd like to know how appropriate people think it is as a systems programming
language.  Someone else said, scripting is good, embedded is bad.  What
about huge honking piles of code?  What happens as you scale up?

I'd also like to know, how much Ruby aficionados care about growth and
promulgating the language.  Do you have, for instance, any working groups
dedicated to the marketing of Ruby?  Or is your community not that
specialized yet, or even interested in that yet?


-- 
Cheers,                         www.3DProgrammer.com
Brandon Van Every               Seattle, WA

20% of the world is real.
80% is gobbledygook we make up inside our own heads.