Sean O'Dell wrote:
> Brandon J. Van Every wrote:
>>
>> I agree it's more interesting.  But volume of mindshare, and growth
>> of mindshare, is interesting to both industrialists and archivists.
>> What is Ruby's future?
>
> This is out of the context of my suggestion.  That's another property
> to consider, and a valid one, but it has nothing to do with finding
> people who have switched away from Ruby.

Huh?  If they switched out of Ruby because they didn't perceive it as having
a strong growth potential, that's certainly relevant.  Be careful not to
define everyone's language priorities as identical to your own.  People in
mainstream industry don't decide things solely on narrow technical merits,
they also look at "size of the bandwagon," because it tends to imply how the
GUI, tools, skilled labor markets, and enterprise support are going to go.

> If you're interested in knowing why people have left Ruby for another
> language, as a consideration to help you evaluate it, I would ignore
> the opinions of people who have no opportunity to even try Ruby in
> the first place.

But how much do they have to try before they abandon?

-- 
Cheers,                         www.3DProgrammer.com
Brandon Van Every               Seattle, WA

20% of the world is real.
80% is gobbledygook we make up inside our own heads.