On Wednesday, August 20, 2003, at 02:07 AM, Brandon J. Van Every wrote:

> Sean O'Dell wrote:
>>
>> A billion people could be programming in Perl right now, and that
>> wouldn't mean a thing because the pressure to produce code might have
>> them locked in and unable to make a switch to another script language.
>
> Actually, it would prove something.  It would prove that Perl has 
> industrial
> incumbency.  Then the question would be, is Ruby denting that 
> incumbency?
> Why or why not?

The Master said: "The noble-minded worry about their lack of ability, 
not about people's failure to recognize their ability."

Confucius, The Analects, XV, 19

> [snip]

>> It's those that have made the switch that are most interesting to a
>> person evaluating Ruby.  Who is leaving Perl for Python?  Who is
>> leaving Python for Ruby.  Who has left Ruby for Perl or Python?
>
> I agree it's more interesting.  But volume of mindshare, and growth of
> mindshare, is interesting to both industrialists and archivists.  What 
> is
> Ruby's future?

Standing beside a river, the Master said: "Everythin passes away like 
this, day and night, never resting."

Confucius, The Analects, IX, 17

>
>> The people who code at work and are locked-in to some language and
>> don't enjoy programming enough to do it in their off-time are people
>> who, I think, will have little insight to offer.  Their lack of input
> about
>> Ruby can be safely ignored.  =)
>
> To be honest I find that a bizarre prejudice.  People have to program 
> both
> at work and in their leisure time to have relevant opinions?  Surely 
> not. [snip]

I think you have missed his point. If someone code's at work only in a 
language other than Ruby and doesn't program in their off-time, they 
cannot possibly have an informed view.


Regards,

Mark

The Master said: " A person who can study for three years and never 
worry about a salary - that is very difficult to find."

Confucius, The Analects, VIII, 12