On Sat, Aug 16, 2003 at 06:10:04AM +0900, Ben Giddings wrote:
> Martin Pirker wrote:
> >short question: is there somewhere a comprehensive list of Ruby
> >syntax-highlightning capable text editors (on Linux)?
> >
> >I don't care how "mainstream"[1] they are, it just has to be "good
> >enough", small, simple, text terminal oriented... and with Ruby
> >support :-)
> 
> C'mon... try Emacs/XEmacs...  You know you want to...

No, I don't think he wants to... life is too short :-)

I am a reasonably competent programmer. I used to know the entire 6800 and
6502 instruction sets in hex. But I could never get my head around Emacs;
ctrl-this, meta-that, shift-ctrl-alt-the-other is just too much to cope
with, and distracts me from the job at hand, namely writing stuff. Hell,
last time I tried, I couldn't even *exit* Emacs without going into another
shell and doing 'ps' and 'kill'.

FWIW, my preferred editor is 'joe'. It doesn't do syntax highlighting (never
found the need). But it's very fast, intuitive (by which I mean typing 'd'
inserts a letter 'd' into the document, and hitting backspace deletes the
character to the left!) and the cursor and page keys work properly.

Sure, the editing commands have prefixes, but they're Wordstar-like and
consistent: for programming you will get away with knowing just

   ^K X     exit and save
   ^K Q     exit without save (or just ^C)

   ^K B     start of block
   ^K K     end of block
   ^K C     copy block
   ^K M     move block

   ^K L     jump to line number
   ^K F     find or find and replace  (^L = find again)

i.e. *one* modifier prefix I can cope with. But you don't need to remember
them, since ^K H toggles a help window at the top of the screen, and you
don't even have to remember that because it's displayed in the title bar :-)

Then you pick up a few extra useful keys as you go along:

   ^Y       delete line
   ^A       start of line
   ^E       end of line
   ^_       undo
   ^K R     insert file at cursor point
   ^K W     write block to file
   ^T       toggle modes (e.g. insert/overwrite, line wrap)

I occasionally use the multi-file capability to move chunks of code between
files, and macros to do the same operation repeatedly, but that's about all
I need. The majority of my brain is engaged in productive things, not
working out how to drive the damned editor.

Now, I guess once I've written that all out, it looks like I _have_ learned
a bunch of control-sequences (15 in total). But you don't have to learn any
to start using it productively, and you don't need to keep referring to a
reference book.

Actually that's the other thing about emacs - would I be right in saying the
documentation is in 'GNU info' format? The world did *not* need HTML
reinventing, nor a browser with yet another set of keystrokes to learn!

Cheers,

Brian.