Ben Giddings <ben / thingmagic.com> wrote:
> module Dumb
>   class Fake
>     def do_something?(bar, baz,
>                       bat, buzz)
>       true
>     end
>   end
> end
> 
> An admittedly contrived example, but hopefully ok for the purposes of 
> illustration.  Many people like that sort of alignment, where if there are 
> too many arguments for one line, they continue on the next line and line up 
> with the start of the first argument.

I hate this indentation style. I only use it because it seems to be a
kind of standard, at least in the emacs world.

I prefer
    def do_something?(
      bar, baz, bat, buzz)
      true
    end

or
    def do_something?(
        bar, baz, bat, buzz)
      true
    end

or
    def do_something?(
      bar, # comment bar
      baz, #
      bat, #
      buzz #
    )

I know these are all far from perfect but I dislike anything that
leads to long lines, including tabs. I've seen so much code which
might look fine on a 21' monitor but doesn't fit into smaller screens!

Spaces keep the chosen style. I like that. Code-Editors might handle
spaces and tabs in arbitrary ways. The same isn't true for many other
applications I might want to paste code snipplets into (e. g. a news
reader or a printer).

I also noticed that ruby doesn't allow some of my formatting habits
simply because linebreaks split statements and the ruby interpreter
parses code in a different way as my brain tends to do. ;-)

Cheers
Sascha