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On Sat, Jul 12, 2003 at 09:18:53AM +0900, Sean O'Dell wrote:

> Fair enough: I think choice has nothing to do with applying the term "viral"
> to the GPL, and you think the fact that the developer has a choice
> determines whether "viral" is applicable.
[snip]
>  No, it is not a virus,
> but it does have a viral nature, just like laughter.

Good, we are clear on where we differ.


> Ask yourself this question: do our definitions of "viral" truly differ, or
> are you simply a proponent of the GPL and don't want a term that has so much
> "emotional baggage" applied to it?
>
> My gut feeling here is, you are a GPL proponent, and our definitions of when
> something has a "viral nature" are virtually the same, but you are
> reflexively protecting the GPL against the term "viral."

Our definitions of "viral" really do differ.  I really do understand where 
you are comming from, and why you define "viral" as you do, but I also 
think taht your definition is too broad.  I would not say that laughter is 
viral, for instance.

Now, I will admit that the reason I argue my point strongly is in defence 
of the GPL.  Allow me to explain:

* If you define "viral" the way I do, and you think that the GPL is viral,
  you will be weary of the GPL.

* If you define "viral" the way you do, and you think that the GPL is
  viral, that will not make you weary of the GPL.


This is the reason why once we agreed on what the GPL actually does, I 
felt no urge to argue over the definition of "viral".  At that point it 
became nothing more that how we choose to define a word.  We agree on what 
the GPL IS, and we just disagree on what word to attribute to it.

The fact is, many people do associate with "viral" a need to be weary 
and step wide around it.  That is why the term was chosen by Bill Gates to 
refer to the GPL.  It was to create FUD.

If someone associates these things with viral, I will argue that the GPL 
is not viral.  If someone (like you) does not, I will just agree to 
disagree on the definition of a word.


> Is it possible you are just being defensive from the term "viral?"

My definition of the term "viral" is honestly and very truly what I 
believe the word "viral" implies.  I would not call laughter viral, for 
instance.

I do admit that I wouldn't care about it if it wasn't being applied to the 
GPL.

- -- 
Daniel Carrera         | OpenPGP fingerprint:
Graduate TA, Math Dept | 6643 8C8B 3522 66CB D16C D779 2FDD 7DAC 9AF7 7A88
UMD  (301) 405-5137    | http://www.math.umd.edu/~dcarrera/pgp.html
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