"Daniel Carrera" <dcarrera / math.umd.edu> wrote in message
news:20030710222923.GC1662 / math.umd.edu...
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> On Fri, Jul 11, 2003 at 07:22:23AM +0900, Gawnsoft wrote:
>
> > >GPL code imposes a condition upon its use that some people don't like.
> > >Fine.  But you are not forced to use the GPL code, hence it is not
viral.
> >
> > If you use it in contact with your own code [and, to be be absolutely
> > pedantic about it, choose not to break the GPL licensing terms] it
> > spreads to your own code.
> >
> > Hence it is viral, in that there is an effect from contagion.
>
> Not it DOESN'T.  That's what I've been saying all along.
>
> I if DID, then it WOULD be viral.  The common misunderstanding is that you
> enter GPL code into your program, the only way to comply with the license
> is to make your own work GPL.
>
> If that WERE the case, then the GPL WOULD be a viral license.
>
> However, the GPL does not do that.  It is impossible for a license to do
> that.  Copyright law does not permit it.
>
> In particular, you have the option of removing the GPL code you took.  A
> virus doesn't do that.
>
> You always have a choice, even after the GPL code has been entered in your
> code.
>
> Including GPL code into your own will not, ever, change the license of
> your code.  The only one who can change the license of your code is you.
>
>
> > But remember, the GPL was designed to encourage the spread of the GPL.
>
> No!  It was designed for the protection of my own GPL code.  Not for its
> own spread.  Go to the GNU website.  You'll see.

Actually, if you incorporate GPL code into your application, if you intend
to release your application, it MUST be released as GPL (with the usual
exceptions).  I'm not sure if you are just being vague, or don't realize
exactly how it works.  You DO maintain full copyrights to your source code,
however, the copy of code you release as GPL is GPL forever; you cannot
rescind the license on the copy of code you have released, and the GPL
(which is, quite frankly, viral) will apply to any subsequently developed
applications with which others have included your GPL code.  If you wish to
release it under another, non-GPL, license, you are free to make
arrangements with the original authors of the GPL source code you have
included in your application to license with them (under their terms) a
non-GPL version of their code, thus removing you from the obligation of
releasing your application under the GPL license (assuming none of their
code contains GPL code).  With those obligations removed, you are then free
to license your application to others under YOUR terms.  But so long as your
application depends on other GPL code, it can only be released under the
GPL.  Inversely, if you do not intend to release your application (I.E., it
is used only internally within your company), the GPL does not apply at all,
and your code is fully protected under the license you give it (employees
may not steal it and release it, etc.).

I hope that made things more clear and I didn't just create a lot of
confusion.

    Sean O'Dell