Guillaume Marcais wrote:

> On Mon, 2003-06-30 at 11:19, Anders Borch wrote:
> 
>>Guillaume Marcais wrote:
>>
>>>On Mon, 2003-06-30 at 08:19, Dominik Werder wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Hello,
>>>>
>>>>I'm developing at the moment on a windows machine with textpad, the best 
>>>>editor I've ever seen :)
>>>>But now I'll switch on a linux desktop for a project and would like to know 
>>>>if there is something like textpad for linux.
>>>>I know that vi and emacs are very often used, but I miss the really cool 
>>>>sidebar where textpad lists all open files. You just (single-)click on it 
>>>>and then you can continue editing at the position where you've stopped.
>>>>I'm sure thats also possible on linux but I don't know how...
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>xemacs has tabs for opened files, plus all the usual emacs glory :)
>>
>>gnu emacs has a speedbar (a side bar) which can show a list of open 
>>files (or other neat things like a list of functions - in some modes).
>>
>>I wasn't trying to fuel the gnu emacs vs xemacs fire, and I'm sure 
>>xemacs supports the speedbar too :)
>>
> 
> 
> I didn't either, and I actually use emacs for my daily business. I
> didn't know about the speedbar of emacs. How do you get it?
> 
> Guillaume.
> 

it's quite easy (of cause ;) )

M-x speedbar

I used it *alot* with c-mode (back when I still coded in C) for which it 
will enumerate all functions which you can click to go to, very ide-like 
and neat :)

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