Saluton!

* "Pe, Botp"; 2003-06-21, 12:58 UTC:
> Not perfect, but understandable enough...  sigh, if only I could
> read Japs...

If that means 'I cannot decipher the characters' consider 'kakasi'
otherwise consider 'Japanese for Busy People' (Komyunike-shon no tame
no nihongo)

Let me detail what the Japanese title means because the explanation
of that title reveals three important features of Japanese. It is

a) lack of numerus and
b) the interpretation of 'no' (often translated as 'of).
c) use of foreign languages

'Nihongo' is written in Kanji and means 'Japanese language', 'tame'
is written in hiragana and in this case means 'for the sake of'.

Very interesting is 'Komyunike-shon'. It is written in Katakana. As a
rule of thumb Katakana is either used as an equivalent of bold face
or to mark that the word has been taken from another language. In
this case it obviously is the latter: It is nothing but
'communication' written in Katakana. So if something that could not
be autotranslated is written in Katakana try reading it aloud.

Finally 'no' denotes a relation and often can simply be translated as
'of'. Maybe you know Hayao Miyazaki's Anime/Manga 'Nausicaof the
valley of winds' (I am unsure if the numerus is correct because
Japanese doesn't have that concept and I only know the German and
Japanese title for sure).

The japanese title is 'Kaze no tani no Naushika' where 'kaze' means
'wind', 'tani' means 'valley' and 'Naushika' is the name of the
heroine. You see the analogy but also the major difference - Japanese
does express it 'the other way round'.

All in all, the Japanese title means 'Japanese for communication'.

HTH,

Josef 'Jupp' Schugt