on 6/15/03 12:47 PM, Yura at yura / opmr.com wrote:

> You all know this already, but ...
> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Daniel Carrera [mailto:dcarrera / math.umd.edu]
>> Sent: June 15, 2003 12:11
>> 
>> I just looked up "hungarian notation" in microsoft.com.  I cam accross a
>> tutorial about it.  Here is a quote from it:
>> 
>> This system became widely used inside Microsoft. It came to be known as
>> "Hungarian notation" because the prefixes make the variable
>> names look a
>> bit as though they're written in some non-English language
> 
> http://ootips.org/hungarian-notation.html
> "Hungarian Notation - The Good, The Bad and The Ugly"
> ...
> Hungarian Notation (HN) is a naming convention invented by Charles Simonyi
> from Microsoft. (He is Hungarian)
> 
>> That's about the only thing I agree with in that document.  My personal
>> opinion is that hungarian notation produces the most unreadable code
>> imaginable.  Sure, it produces tiny variable names, but since characters
>> are cheap, and human mental strain expensive, I think that one should
>> minimize the mapping necessary between the human's brain and the code.
> 
> I hate HN and never use it, but it has "nothing" to do with variable names
> per se.  Whatever name you decide to use for the variable you just append
> one letter in front of it denoting the variable type -- you can use
> hMyWindowHandle instead of hWnd.
> 
> Yura.
> 
> 
Sometimes one, sometimes many, ie. lpstrMyMessage.

It's like anything else, you could get used to it, and your brain would
eventually not "see" the lpstr at the beginning, unless you needed to know
it was a long pointer to a string.

Also, the reason it is hWnd instead of something more verbose, is you have
to type it over and over and over when writing Windows programs

Having said all that, I much prefer The Ruby Way.

-- 
Regards,
  JJ

Finally using a Mac!