Saluton!

* Hal E. Fulton; 2003-06-14, 22:26 UTC:
> Actually, the distinction I know is that acronyms have to become a
> pronounceable word -- so laser would be an acronym (used to be
> LASER),

Webster: a word (as radar [that's remote detecting and ranging])
formed from the initial letter or letters of the successive parts or
major parts of a compound term.

In Germany I wouldn't call 'Laser' an acronym because few people know
that it is an abbreviation (a pity in this case because 'light
amplification by stimulated emission of radiation' describes how a
laser actually works).

> but SPCA would not.

What's that?

> Many Americans don't make even this distinction any more.

> Personally I don't care whether it's slang or glossary or whatever.

Hmm, I took a closer look at these and other candidates (excerpts
form Webster's New Encyclopedic Dictionary):

glossary
  1. a list in the back of a book of the hard or unusual words found
     in the text
  2. a dictionary of the special terms found in a particular field of
     study

jargon
  1. a) confused intelligible language : GIBBERISH
     b) a hybrid language or dialect used for communication between
        people of different speech
  2. the technical or specialized vocabulary of a particular
     profession or group
  3. obscure and often pretentiously wordy language

slang (n)
  1. language peculiar to a particular group, trade, or pursuit
     (baseball slang)
  2. an informal nonstandard vocabulary composed typically of
     short-lived coinages, arbitrarily changed words, and
     extravagant, forced, or facetious figures of speech.

slang (vb)
  1. (chiefly British) to abuse with harsh or coarse language
  2. to use slang or vulgar abuse

terminology
  the technical or special terms used in a business, art, science, or
  special subject (the terminology of law)

vocabulary
  1. a list or collection of words or of words and phrases usually
     alphabetically arranged and explained or defined
  2. a sum or stock of words employed by a language, group,
     individual, or work or in a field of knowledge.

Gis,

Josef 'Jupp' Schugt