Meinrad Recheis wrote:
> i find it somewhat strange, that the "name"-attribute is a hash 
> containing the rest of the attributes as also the subnodes of this node.
> do you take the first attribute to identify a node?
 >> No, you can control the structure by using the option 'key_attr' as
 >> described extensively in the tutorial. E.g., you can disable the
 >> folding completely by setting 'key_attr' = [] (the default). Maybe
 >> you want to take another look at the manual and give 'key_attr' a
 >> chance ;-)

> also it could possibly save a lot of finger-typing if you encapsulated 
> the "not so cool" hash in an object that supports XPath
> 
> puts config['server']['kalahari']['address'][1] # vs.
> 
> puts xml.get('/config/server/kalahari/address')[1] # or
> puts xml.get('/config/server(name=kalahari)/address')[1] # best
>> That is really funny, because what you suggest here can be found
 >> in another Ruby library I wrote: XmlConfigFile. Get it from RAA:
 >> http://raa.ruby-lang.org/list.rhtml?name=xml-configfile
 >> It allows you to access configuration parameters in an XML file
 >> using XPath. But many people asked for an easy way to completely
 >> serialize an XML document and so I decided to port XML::Simple to
 >> Ruby. I want to combine these two libraries in the next weeks, i.e.
 >> XmlConfigFile will use XmlSimple for serializing purposes.

> just my suggestions.
 >> Thank you! They are always very welcome!