On Wed, Mar 26, 2003 at 12:09:30AM +0900, Robert Wagner wrote:
> > > i agree with you.  however, my take is the benefits/complexity ratio is 
> > simply
> > > not there for fastcgi and that this is why more people have not adopted 
> > it.  i
> > > have been using it myself and really like it...
> >
> >I'm not sure why it hasn't taken off so much. Many CGI application writers
> >use PHP, and PHP support is noticeably missing from www.fastcgi.com, so they
> >are forced to use mod_php. Perlers will likely use mod_perl if their
> >webserver has it compiled in already, which is often the case (more than
> >mod_fastcgi anyway)
> 
> what's wrong with mod_php? i think concerning simplicity, mod_php is the 
> benchmark...
> many users can update their scripts without having trouble with others, not 
> needing
> webserver restarts etc.

I didn't say there was anything wrong with mod_php - only trying to guess
why mod_fastcgi is not as popular as it might be.

> i once read, mod_php works with aggressive cleaning methods to achieve 
> this. on the
> other hand it's still quite fast. since ruby interpreter is so flexible 
> (morphable) by the
> hands of the user, how can one be safe,
> that the next request will be answered by the same (regarding the premises) 
> interpreter?

Well, it will be the same interpreter, unless Ruby recompiles itself :-)

Typically you would not want a CGI application to morph during its lifetime,
since it will be handling requests from many different clients. It can of
course create a separate object representing each session, and those objects
could morph, but unless you can save them persistently you are not going to
be able to change code without breaking all user sessions.

Remember that objects of singleton classes cannot be serialized.

> >Also, an application can be restarted automatically if its source file has
> >changed (although not the libraries it depends on):
> >
> >   FastCgiConfig -autoUpdate
> 
> what is a library? anything stated in "require"?

Yep, that's what I meant. Apache can check the timestamp of the FCGI program
it is running, but doesn't know how to check the dependencies.

Regards,

Brian.