I currently found some time to "catch up" the NG and read this thread 
carefully.
Now I too have to put my mustard on it.

In article <b4gklc$o21$1 / nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net>, 
n.thomp / roadrunner.nf.net says...
> I have abour 3 or 4 years experience with Linux, and about 2 years
> experience with Java, recently though I decided to quit learning Java
.... Ups. After 2 years experience you're still learning Java? I'll drop 
any ideas to learn Java some day immediately. ;)

Seriously. I don't think the number of languages you know is really 
important. If I would be in need to hire some staff the languages would 
be one of the last issues in my check list. Much more important would be 
the list of reference projects, and the diversity of problems you've 
solved. Of course, somebody has said one should learn at least one new 
language per year. This is a good hint if you find enough time to do 
that. So, Ruby is really not the worst suggestion for this year.
But, if you have to decide to learn Ruby _or_ C++, C++ will have much 
more impact on your skill-sheet because you will find much more projects 
offered for C++ then for Ruby. Unfortunately, C++ will also need much 
more time until you _really_ know it, so, for an experienced project 
manager 1 year experience in C++ will be nothing, whilst 1 year 
experience in Ruby backed by other experiences will be much more.
(Because everybody who once started Visual-C++ adds C++ to its skills.)

Additionally, Ruby gives the possibility to learn something about Tk, 
which is probably more known to project managers (or hiring stuff), 
also, it has modules for database-access, which helps to extend your 
knowledge of SQL, and so on.

Also, Ruby is available on many OS's, so you'll have a powerful 
_scripting_ language in your portfolio, which is important for 
administrative tasks.

This is my hint: Learn Ruby, use it to learn more - API's, OS's, do not 
bother too much for the details. It will be the details you don't need 
in your next project.

Regards,
Michael B.