Hi!

I did play a bit with kakasi in order to see in how far it can help a
gai-jin in understanding texts written in Japanese. I post this
because I found a way of calling kakasi that can be *very* helpful:

kakasi -Ja -Ha -Ka -f -s -r{hepburn,kunrei}

(Where hepburn or kunrei is the writing system used). This results in
all Hirgana and Katakana translated to Romaji. Kanjis are still
present but Furigana (spelling; using Romaji) is added.

This is very helpful if you e.g. use Meriam Webster's Japanese-
English Dictionary that requires you to know the Hepburn romanization
of a Kanji in order to look it up. In a case where the Kanji is not
unique you can then compare the Kanjis.

A rather high-level usage (that may even be useful for Japanese) is:

kakasi -JH -f -s

This keeps the text almost unchanged but adds furigana (using
Hiragana) to the Kanjis.

Josef 'Jupp' Schugt
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