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THANX all! I got cygwin running. Two other questions though:
 - when I click on the .rb module the command sceen blanks and disappears so I can't see the result; if I execute from the command line, I see the result - what gives?
- because ruby.exe is in the bin directory, I can only execute the .rb from there; in other words, I can only store the .rb in the same directory as ruby.exe; how do I get around this?
 Wesley Moxam <wmoxam / klickit.com> wrote:The Windows installer should set the correct file associations so that
double clicking a ruby file will execute it.

If you want to run ruby from the command line just type: ruby scriptname.rb

-- Wes

----- Original Message -----
From: "Seth Kurtzberg" 
To: "ruby-talk ML" 
Sent: Monday, March 10, 2003 3:13 PM
Subject: Re: Thinking of learning Ruby


> The easiest way is to install cygwin (www.cygwin.com) which gives you a
UNIX
> like environment with a bash shell. Then you use #! just like a real
> computer. :)
>
> On Monday 10 March 2003 12:31 pm, jeepcreep wrote:
> > Just to take you a little off subject for a moment:
> > I'm also a newby. I went to your site and installed Ruby (Windows
version).
> > On the comand line level it works just fine. Now to create a program.
> > Therein lies my problem. At home I am running LINUX, so I don't expect a
> > problem (I'll install the LINUX version and use #!). At work, though,
I'm
> > not that lucky. I am running on an XP platform. I can't use #! here so
how
> > do I define the directory where my .rb modules will be run from? Daniel
> > Carrera wrote:> Althoug getting a job in
> > programming is a concern of mine, I think
> >
> > > I'd still be able to find another line of work. I am however very
> > > interested in being a volunteer developer for a Linux distribution,
> > > it would certainly help me learn the programming language.
> >
> > Most of Linux/OSS is written in C, in the Unix tradition. KDE is an
> > exception, it is mostly C++.
> >
> > C is easier to learn than C++, and to some degree it is a subset of
> > C++.
> >
> > I would suggest you learn Ruby first, then C then (possibly) C++. In
> > my case I've never had a compelling reason to learn C++. I only know
> > C.
>
> --
> Seth Kurtzberg
> M. I. S. Corp.
> 480-661-1849
> seth / cql.com
>


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<P>THANX all! I got cygwin running.&nbsp;Two other questions though:
<P>&nbsp;-&nbsp;when I click on the .rb module the command sceen blanks and disappears so I can't see the result; if I execute from the command line, I see the result - what gives?
<P>- because ruby.exe is in the bin directory, I can only execute the .rb from there; in other words, I can only store the .rb in the same directory as ruby.exe; how do I get around this?
<P>&nbsp;<B><I>Wesley Moxam &lt;wmoxam / klickit.com&gt;</I></B> wrote:
<BLOCKQUOTE styleADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">The Windows installer should set the correct file associations so that<BR>double clicking a ruby file will execute it.<BR><BR>If you want to run ruby from the command line just type: ruby scriptname.rb<BR><BR>-- Wes<BR><BR>----- Original Message -----<BR>From: "Seth Kurtzberg" <SETH / CQL.COM><BR>To: "ruby-talk ML" <RUBY-TALK / RUBY-LANG.ORG><BR>Sent: Monday, March 10, 2003 3:13 PM<BR>Subject: Re: Thinking of learning Ruby<BR><BR><BR>&gt; The easiest way is to install cygwin (www.cygwin.com) which gives you a<BR>UNIX<BR>&gt; like environment with a bash shell. Then you use #! just like a real<BR>&gt; computer. :)<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; On Monday 10 March 2003 12:31 pm, jeepcreep wrote:<BR>&gt; &gt; Just to take you a little off subject for a moment:<BR>&gt; &gt; I'm also a newby. I went to your site and installed Ruby (Windows<BR>version).<BR>&gt; &gt; On the comand line level it works just fine. Now
  to create a program.<BR>&gt; &gt; Therein lies my problem. At home I am running LINUX, so I don't expect a<BR>&gt; &gt; problem (I'll install the LINUX version and use #!). At work, though,<BR>I'm<BR>&gt; &gt; not that lucky. I am running on an XP platform. I can't use #! here so<BR>how<BR>&gt; &gt; do I define the directory where my .rb modules will be run from? Daniel<BR>&gt; &gt; Carrera <DCARRERA / MATH.UMD.EDU>wrote:&gt; Althoug getting a job in<BR>&gt; &gt; programming is a concern of mine, I think<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; I'd still be able to find another line of work. I am however very<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; interested in being a volunteer developer for a Linux distribution,<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; it would certainly help me learn the programming language.<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; Most of Linux/OSS is written in C, in the Unix tradition. KDE is an<BR>&gt; &gt; exception, it is mostly C++.<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; C is easier to learn than C++, and to some degree it is a 
 subset of<BR>&gt; &gt; C++.<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; I would suggest you learn Ruby first, then C then (possibly) C++. In<BR>&gt; &gt; my case I've never had a compelling reason to learn C++. I only know<BR>&gt; &gt; C.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; --<BR>&gt; Seth Kurtzberg<BR>&gt; M. I. S. Corp.<BR>&gt; 480-661-1849<BR>&gt; seth / cql.com<BR>&gt;<BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE>
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