On Sunday 09 March 2003 06:22 pm, Phil Tomson wrote:
> In article <b4gklc$o21$1 / nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net>,
>
> anonimous <n.thomp / roadrunner.nf.net> wrote:
> >I have abour 3 or 4 years experience with Linux, and about 2 years
> >experience with Java, recently though I decided to quit learning Java
> >because I found it rather slow and lacking, the biggest problem is that
> > Sun Microsystems made to many libraries for some functions and not enough
> > for other functions, they also have quite a few bugs that are noticable
> > when one tries to apply custom effects to GUI's such as setting colours
> > with .setBackground() and .setForeground() forsetting the colours. I am
> > now looking for one or two alternative programming languages to replace
> > Java, I am mostly interested in C, C++, Ruby, Python and Perl. What I
> > would like to know is which one would be better off in your opinion(s),
> > one of the things I concider important in a programming language is
> > weather or not its good enough to get me a job in programming. I look
> > forward to your reply(s) :-)
>
> Welcome,
>
> Of course we're pretty biased toward Ruby being your next programming
> language ;-)
>
> I think you'll find Ruby's libraries a lot more compact than Java's.
> Also, you'll generally find that you can do the same program in Ruby with
> about 1/2 to 1/3 of the lines as the equivlient Java program (with no hit
> to readability as you would have in Perl).
>
> Now as to your point about which language to learn in order to find a job
> in programming:
> 1) Right now there aren't many jobs in programming and there are lots of
> _very_ experienced folks out there who know several of the languages you
> list (quite well) and are not finding work.... so in the short term, don't
> expect to find a job in programming unless you've got several years of
> experience - you're competing against folks who have lots of experience.
> 2) After reading and considering #1, learn C++ - when the job market does
> eventually return (someyear - a year ago I said "In a year", now I make no
> predictions other than it definately won't be anytime this year.)

I've most definitely seen an uptick in programming jobs in the last month or 
so.  After seeing basically nothing for quite a while, I've had two 
conversations with potential employers.  Of course, that is hardly 
earthshaking, but it is an improvement.

  Knowing
> C++ still gets you into the most number of places.
> 3) Now, after considering #2, forget about which programming language will
> get you a job and think about which programming language will cause you to
> learn something about the practice of programming.  I would suggest that
> Ruby is an excellent choice for this. (and one can argue that you've got
> plenty of time to do this)  You'll definately learn object oriented
> programming with Ruby and it will definately have a different flavor than
> OO programming you've dont in Java because Ruby isn't statically typed.
> OO programming in Ruby 'feels' much different than it does in C++ or Java
> and it's a very positive feeling, IMHO.  [That's not to say that there are
> no Ruby jobs out there, but the number of jobs that list Ruby as a
> requirement is still very small.  However, I've found Ruby in lots of
> places where I didn't expect to find it - Ruby is being snuk in the
> backdoor at lots of places kind of like Perl was 8-10 years ago.]
>
> You mention that Java is slow.  I'm assuming you mean that programs
> written in Java are slow to execute.  You definately won't find Ruby
> faster than Java for most things.  However, it's quite easy to write
> extentions for Ruby in C/C++ (another reason to learn C/C++) such that you
> use C/C++ for speed critical parts of your code and Ruby for the parts you
> want ot develop quickly.
>
> Phil

-- 
Seth Kurtzberg
M. I. S. Corp.
480-661-1849
seth / cql.com