On Saturday, February 15, 2003, at 04:59 PM, Daniel Carrera wrote:

> Hello,
> Suppose that I want to translate a Perl module into Ruby.  The Perl 
> module
> is available under Perl's dual license: Artistic and GPL.
>
> Does that mean that I cannot release the Ruby version under Ruby's dual
> license?

The dual license means that you can pick one or the other as the basis 
for your use of the Perl module. Because of differences between the 
Artistic license and the GPL you cannot pick both for purposes of your 
derivative work. Note that a translation is usually a derivative work. 
Whichever one you pick, you have to follow the terms of that license.

The GPL is the more restrictive of the two licenses -- if you pick the 
GPL you must license your derivative work to others pursuant to the GPL 
only (you can't authorize use of the derivative work pursuant to the 
Artistic license or any other non-GPL license).

If you pick the Artistic license as the basis of your use of the Perl 
module to create a derivative work the licensing of your derivative 
work to others must comply with the Artistic license. Section 3.a. of 
the Artistic License is the relevant one and all of Section 3 is 
reproduced below. As I read it, you can redistribute your derivative 
work pursuant to any license that is free (as to cost and ability to 
modify) and permits redistribution. I think both of Ruby's licenses 
meet this standard of "Freely Available".

Artistic License Section 3:

"3. You may otherwise modify your copy of this Package in any way, 
provided that you insert a prominent notice in each changed file 
stating how and when you changed that file, and provided that you do at 
least ONE of the following:

a. place your modifications in the Public Domain or otherwise make them 
     Freely Available [this means no fee charged and a right to 
redistribute], such as by posting said modifications to Usenet or an 
equivalent medium, or placing the modifications on a major archive site 
such as uunet.uu.net, or by allowing the Copyright Holder to include 
your modifications in the Standard Version of the Package.

b. use the modified Package only within your corporation or 
organization.

c. rename any non-standard executables so the names do not conflict 
with standard executables, which must also be provided, and provide a 
separate manual page for each non-standard executable that clearly     
documents how it differs from the Standard Version.

d. make other distribution arrangements with the Copyright Holder."