Hello ruby-ists,

* Are you a nuby (newbie ruby-ists)?
* Are you an oby (oldie but golden ruby-ists)?
* Do you yearn to meet with other ruby-ists?
* Do you need to discuss your problem?
* Want to chat with the people who have been responsible for ruby's
  growth?
* Or do you just want to have some polite conversations and relax for
  a while during your office hour?


Then come to the #ruby-lang channel at irc.openprojects.net.  There
will probably be someone there to help you or at least to talk with
practically anytime.


Hear the testimonial of a new #ruby-lang member:

<gavin> Newbies should get stuck into IRC: they'll get a quick
response, and the conversational style allows feedback without
clogging the mailing list.


You don't know what IRC is? No problem. Here is a short intro to IRC
and a brief hint on what software you need.

  IRC /I-R-C/ n. [Internet Relay Chat] A worldwide "party line"
     network that allows one to converse with others in real time. IRC
     is structured as a network of Internet servers, each of which
     accepts connections from client programs, one per user. The IRC
     community and the {Usenet} and {MUD} communities overlap to some
     extent, including both hackers and regular folks who have
     discovered the wonders of computer networks. Some Usenet jargon
     has been adopted on IRC, as have some conventions such as
     {emoticon}s. There is also a vigorous native jargon, represented
     in this lexicon by entries marked `[IRC]'. See also {talk mode}.
                                                -- Jargon Dictionary

You'd need an IRC client. For Windows, there is mIRC
(http://www.mirc.co.uk/). For *nix, there are xchat, bitchx, and many
others. Also to note, Mozilla has an IRC client too, called ChatZilla.

Yours,
YS.