This is the wrong attitude to take -- management, for good or bad, has the ability to choose the tools that will be used in a production environment. Even if they are ultimately the wrong tools chosen for the wrong reasons.

I am currently on a contract which has the remnants of an ass who did pretty much what you suggested. He read a book on Python, decided that he wanted to program in that, and rather than trying to convince management to switch, he wrote a pseudo-Python "compiler" for Perl. (IMO, he chose the worst features from Python: the idiotic indentation for blocks and the slice operator.) So now, more than two years after he was fired. I have to deal with his maverick "solution." What Shannon is doing is the right thing.

While it would be "nice" to be able to deliver solutions without the businesspeople having a say on the technology, the reality is that Shannon isn't working alone -- she's part of a team, and the system will probably outlive her tenure at the company.

-a
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austin ziegler
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