Ted wrote:
> 
> Yuk!  Ruby was presented to me as a 'clean' language.
> Aliases are -- in my not-so-humble-opinion -- an abomination.
> Aliases mean that when reading someone else's code you have to remember TWO things instead of one.
> They serve no purpose except the preservation of the status quo of a cat-heard of programmers.

Yes they do. They provide information about _intent_. Granted, some
aliases have little variance between the meanings, but when you are
reading someones code, there are two things going on. What does it do
and why does it do it? The first is closely knit to the love of the
"There is only one way to do it", since it is easier to figure out what
the code actually does. (Python?) IMHO, that is akin to treating the
human brain like a compiler.

The "Why does it do it", is the perspective of sane fans of TIMTOWDY.
(Ruby?) Unfortunately, some other (insane) fans of TIMTOWDY manage to
drop both the why and the what. (Perl?) The discussion about the
proposals of the Stack and Queue aliases is a good example of a sane use
of TIMTOWDY. There is so much power in Ruby, that using descriptive
aliases communicating intent is like using those eclipse glasses: With
them you can stare at the Sun without going blind. (I.e. understand how
someone uses an Array without going mad.)

But I'm not for the elseif alias, though. Keywords are sacred and should
be kept to a minimum. If anything, howsabout dumping it all together and
parse the combination "else if" specially?

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