On Thu, 5 Dec 2002 04:20:08 +0900, "Chris Pine" <nemo / hellotree.com>
wrote:

>they understand everything they see.  *That is important!*  You must inspire
>confidence in the new programmer.  I can't stress that enough:  Confidence
>is crucial!

<delurk>
Just a brief note: When I was new to Ruby (even newer than I am now,
that is), I haven't had any recent programming experience. It had been
ten years since I last coded anything -- and even then I was only
"fluent" in various Basic dialects (but had never "gotten" C/C++, and
I still don't). I echo what Chris wrote about IRB being confusing --
it did exactly this to me and left me wondering what the heck I'm
supposed to do. Typing in code bits (essentially "real scripts") and
executing them seemed far more "intuitive" to me, and had better
learning results. This is probably a very individual "thing", however,
and perhaps cannot and should not be generalized.

I found Mark Slagell's "Teach yourself Ruby in 21 days" to be a
valuable help in picking up the basics of Ruby (and OO scripting
languages in general). The author uses IRB only briefly, early on, to
teach some principles (variables, etc), and then quickly moves on to
presenting complete code. I think that anyone who strives to write or
develop a book for "People Who Aren't (Yet) Programmers" should take a
glance at Mark's works. This "nuby" most certainly would have given up
without this book. :) (and I am glad that I did buy it despite its
awful title)

-M.
--
To e-mail: use the initials of my name and add "at felinism dot com".