> -----Original Message-----
> From: ibraheem@ignoramus [mailto:ibraheem@ignoramus]On Behalf Of
> Ibraheem Ibz Umaru-Mohammed
> Sent: Saturday, October 19, 2002 1:03 PM
> To: ruby-talk ML
> Subject: Re: string[lastchar] -> string?
> 
> 
> * Szabolcs Szasz <sz / szasz.hu> [2002-10-19 20:55]:
> > Ahhh, yes! Thanks!
> > 
> > I was reading the Pragmatic... book and the String class
> > doesn't have that 'chr' method there. (And a special thanks 
> > for the negative indexes, which I missed completely...)
> > 
> 
> I usually just fire up the interpreter, and do something like:
> 
<snip />

There's also ri


$ ri String
------------------------------------------------------------------------
     class: String
------------------------------------------------------------------------
     A String object holds and manipulates an arbitrary sequence of
     bytes, typically representing characters. String objects may be
     created using String::new or as literals (see page 204).
     Because of aliasing issues, users of strings should be aware of the
     methods that modify the contents of a String object. Typically,
     methods with names ending in ``!'' modify their receiver, while
     those without a ``!'' return a new String. However, there are
     exceptions, such as String#[]=.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
     %, *, +, <<, <=>, ==, ===, =~, [], []=, capitalize, capitalize!,
     center, chomp, chomp!, chop, chop!, concat, count, crypt, delete,
     delete!, downcase, downcase!, dump, each, each_byte, each_line,
     empty?, gsub, gsub!, hash, hex, include?, index, intern, length,
     ljust, new, next, next!, oct, replace, reverse, reverse!, rindex,
     rjust, scan, size, slice, slice!, split, squeeze, squeeze!, strip,
     strip!, sub, sub!, succ, succ!, sum, swapcase, swapcase!, to_f,
     to_i, to_s, to_str, tr, tr!, tr_s, tr_s!, unpack, upcase, upcase!,
     upto, ~
------------------------------------------------------------------------



BTW, chr is not part of String, but belongs to Integers

$ ri chr
------------------------------------------------------------ Integer#chr
     int.chr -> aString
------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Returns a string containing the ASCII character represented by the
     receiver's value.
        65.chr    #=> "A"
        ?a.chr    #=> "a"
        230.chr   #=> "\346"




James