MikkelFJ wrote:
> "Marco K?gler" <marco.koegler / web.de> wrote in message
> news:3DA4318A.1020007 / web.de...

..

>>std::stringstream s(someString);
>>
>>while (!s.eof())
> 
> .... becuase eof is defined _eof you get

Yes, I know that. I don't like that the win32/win32.h header has all 
these #defines in the first place. It is extremely intrusive practice, 
IMHO. I'd like to do something about these, but I'm pretty new to Ruby 
and don't know how the defines are used/why they are necessary? For 
example, why are they exposed to client-code? I was hoping somebody on 
the list might clarify this.

> 
>>while (!s._eof())
> <SNIP>


> #include "the file that is the problem"
> #undef eof
> #include <my stl stuff>
> 
> Also, it seems to matter what order you are including in when dealing with
> stl and <windows.h>, so possibly a simple rearrangement of includes might
> solve the problem.

It doesn't ... it can't as long as the #define is still active in my 
code, as I'm having the problems there, not in an included file. I 
already placed the Ruby headers last to counter problems with other 
includes.

-Marco