Hi,

Mauricio Fern?ndez <batsman.geo / yahoo.com> wrote:
> But all you're getting is "type error" instead of another description.
> It could eventually help you discern where the error was, but the
> application won't run better.

Agreed.  The error message is just an example; in the real thing it may be
much more helpful.  Well, the only objective is just like when we are
compiling a C code, where we get an error during compile time.  Here, we
only get the error during run time, but at least we catch it right away,
before the erroneous data is used further down deeper in the
function/method (which sometimes took me longer to trace :) )

Regarding compile time checking, I don't think it is impossible, and I
think it is easier if we do have the strict rule that "a = b" gives a
syntax error during compile if "b.kind_of? a" is false.  We know the
type/class of a and b from their declarations.

> I used to love C's reduced set of reserved words. I thought I'd hate
> syntactic sugar, for I had used Pascal and it was far too verbose (I
> didn't clearly see the difference between verbosity and sugar at that
> time). Then went through several languages before finding Ruby, and now
> I must say I do absolutely love to have some sugar :-)

> OTOH I wouldn't like Ruby to end like Perl:
> 	"there's 243 ways to do it"
> and having 5 syntactic variations for each one.

Yes, yes, Perl is "there is more than one way to do it" and Python is
"there is only one way to do it".  Ruby....?

> -- 
>  _           _                             
> | |__   __ _| |_ ___ _ __ ___   __ _ _ __  
> | '_ \ / _` | __/ __| '_ ` _ \ / _` | '_ \ 
> | |_) | (_| | |_\__ \ | | | | | (_| | | | |
> |_.__/ \__,_|\__|___/_| |_| |_|\__,_|_| |_|
> 	Running Debian GNU/Linux Sid (unstable)
> batsman dot geo at yahoo dot com
>   
> 'Ooohh.. "FreeBSD is faster over loopback, when compared to Linux
> over the wire". Film at 11.'
> 	-- Linus Torvalds

By the way, what is "batsman"? :) I have been curious for a long time.  Is
he related to Batman? :)

Regards,

Bill