stibbs wrote:

>Hi, first i would like to state that i absolutely love Ruby more than any
>other language i use (perl, python, PHP, javascript, and now ruby). Others
>i work with also have taken a look at Ruby and most have the same feeling
>about it i do. That being said, we found that there is a huge lack of
>english documentation and therefore would consume to much of our time to
>learn it and apply it for use in our work.
>
The Ruby book list:

    http://www.rubygarden.org/ruby?RubyBookList

lists a considerable number of English-language books. "Programming 
Ruby", the one that most Ruby users consider to be a "must-have", is 
freely available on-line here:

    http://www.rubycentral.com/book

It's also included in the Windows installer for Ruby. Some of the other 
books, such as the "Ruby Developer's Guide", focus more on contributed 
modules for GUI development, database access, XML and web services.

>suggestions:
>
>Documentation:
>
>english speaking ruby users should get together and copy the idea of
>python's module index.
>
Most, if not all, of Ruby's built-in modules are documented in 
"Programming Ruby". It is true that for some of the contributed modules, 
the only available documentation is in Japanese.

>Other than documentation, maybe it would be a good idea for people who
>also know Perl to go through CPAN and port the modules that are very
>useful to various types of companies.
>
Maybe you could be one of those elusive "people"? The library modules page:

    http://www.rubygarden.org/ruby?LibraryModules

serves as one focus for this kind of wish list. And, if you haven't 
already discovered it, the Ruby Application Archive:

    http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/raa.html

is the central catalog, so to speak, for contributed Ruby modules.

>I can honestly say that if there was the type of documentation available
>for Ruby that there is for Python our company would adopt it, we already
>like Ruby because from doing a bit of research Ruby has more community
>contributed modules than Python. In my career as being a sys admin and
>web development programmer I have noticed is that when companies are
>looking to embrace open source tools they look at the community support
>which basically adds up to "how many modules do they have that can be used
>in business and how are the docs". Our project manager even took a liking
>to Ruby but it was agreed by all of us we can't use it due to the lack of
>thorough documentation on standard modules/classes/methods and also
>community contributed ones.
>
You are correct that Ruby's community is very active and enthusiastic, 
and if you can be more specific about which modules, classes or methods 
aren't documented to your satisfaction that would probably help people 
point you to the appropriate resources. As I mentioned earlier, there's 
a lot of good English-language documentation available (on-line and 
elsewhere).

>Ruby is an excellent language, with Perl 6 taking at least another year or
>(and most likely) more and the Python community's focus on what is
>obviously hobby projects that seem to be for the most part rebuilding the
>wheel 7 times over, you as a community should take more of a proactive
>approach to pushing Ruby onto the general public (average joe programmers)
>and companies. The way to do it is through thorough documentation and
>modules companies find useful. I suggest following in the style of matz by
>grabbing the best from other communities and applying it to Ruby (Python
>style documentation and the most frequently used modules from CPAN).
>
As a member of the Ruby community, I hereby appoint you as a fellow 
member of the Ruby community. So get to work!

>Please take into consideration my co-workers and I do know how to use
>google and ri, we have found all the documentation and articles that are
>out there on Ruby, it was pretty much a 2 week long project our dev crew
>and project manager did in our spare/off-work time.
>
Interesting. When I do a google search for "ruby":

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=ruby

the fifth link in the list is the on-line version of "Programming Ruby". 
The eighth link is to the Ruby Garden portal site, which is the source 
of most of the other links I've quoted.

>I like Ruby, this isn't meant in any way as a put-down, it is meant to maybe
>get some programmers to take more of a proactive approach to spreading
>Ruby and think a little bit as a small company would if there were lots of
>lazy but big competition in the same field with the idea of taking over
>most of the market share within a year or so. Once Perl 6 is out, if Ruby
>hasn't edged its way into a bit more companies, this is just an assumption
>(and a big one), I think it will be very hard for Ruby to pick up steam
>in the English-speaking countries.
>
Sounds like Perl 6 is two years too late (and counting). Ruby has been 
picking up a tremendous amount of "steam" in English-speaking countries 
over the last few years; it didn't just suddenly appear out of thin air 
when you heard about it a few weeks ago. Since I'm not a Perl user, 
what, specifically, are the new features of Perl 6 that you believe will 
cause Ruby to lose steam once Perl 6 is released? That is to say, what 
is it that is changing between the currently-available Perl 5.x and Perl 
6 that will suddenly nullify the things that have drawn large numbers of 
"converts" from the Perl and Python camps?