Am I the only one who didn't get 'links below'??

: )

-Rich

----- Original Message -----
From: <Dave / PragmaticProgrammer.com>
To: "ruby-talk ML" <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>; "ruby-weekly-news ML"
<ruby-weekly-news / ruby-lang.org>
Sent: Monday, August 19, 2002 6:33 PM
Subject: Ruby Weekly News


>
>    Ruby Weekly News: 08/19/2002
>
>    A summary of activity on the ruby-talk mailing list, brought to you
>    this week by Pat Eyler.
>
>    ANNOUNCEMENTS
>    =============
>
>    ZenWeb 2.11.0
>           ZenWeb is a tool for building websites (not web pages). It
>           applies a defined set of fileters to files of content (often
>           flat text or lightly marked up text (think wiki)) and creted
>           hierarchically navigable pages with a consistent theme and
>           design.
>
>    FXRuby-1.0.12
>           Ruby bindings for the FOX GUI toolkit. Source, windows
>           installers, and RPMs are available.
>
>    ONI - Object Network Interface
>           Formerly a portion of TomsLib, now a separate project, ONI is a
>           YAML (Yet Another Markup Language) version of XML-RPC and SOAP.
>           For now, the code is still in TomsLib, but will be made
>           available separately soon.
>
>    Where Ruby Really Sparkles
>           Not software, but an announcment nonetheless. Dave Thomas'
>           article on network programming with ruby is in the latest
>           edition of "Linux Magazine".
>
>    Net/Proto
>           This module provides an interface to the getprotobyname(),
>           getprotobynumber() and getprotoent() functions. (More cool
>           stuff from Daniel Berger ... thank you sir.)
>
>    Narf cgi library alpha release
>           NARF is an attempt to create a lighter web library. It has been
>           designed so that the api can be easily tested from within
>           applications and so that the api is thouroughly tested
>           internally.
>
>    INTERESTING THREADS
>    ===================
>
>    Ruby Weekly News
>           Just to be self-referential ... we discussed the Ruby Weekly
>           News. It seems that there is some interest in how things get
>           done. Holden and I briefly replied, and invited people to let
>           us know if there is any news that needs to be made more
>           available.
>
>    Problems with Marshal
>           Daniel Berger ran into inconsistancies when using Marshal.
>           After some troublshooting it was determined that he was using
>           gets/puts to pass data to/from sockets, thus missing some of
>           the data. Using #read and #write was recommended. (Hugh Sasse
>           recommended packing the data into base64 for transmission and
>           provided sample code to do so.)
>
>    A few newbie questions...
>           Christopher asked about RubyWin and other windows specific
>           bits, then asked for tips getting started with ruby in general.
>
>           Patrick Bennet answered that RubyWin is an MDI app to
>           protoytpe/test Ruby. It allows you to type in code, execute it,
>           tweak it, ad infinitum. For the beginner, he recommended the
>           Pickaxe. Some discussion followed about the online version of
>           the book. I liked Tim Hunter's comment 'the online version ...
>           is most useful as a supplement to a printed copy. ... buy the
>           book and consider it an investment...'. _The_Ruby_Way_ was
>           suggested as the second book you should buy.
>
>    Second Sydney Ruby users group meeting
>           The Sydney (.au) users group met on the 15th of August in the
>           Woolloomooloo Bay Hotel. (Even if I didn't think users groups
>           rock, I'd have included this tidbit just so I could type that
>           name!) From here on out they'll be meeting on the third
>           Thursday of the month. If you've got travel plans to Sydney,
>           make a note.
>
>    Thought Question: Where does "new" come from?
>           Hal Fulton put the question, and was immediately answered by
>           Matz. The discussion took off from there. I can't summarize it,
>           so you'd better go and read it yourself.
>
>    Using Test::Unit to assert messages appeared on $stdout/$stderr
>           Jeff Gray wondered about using Test::Unit to check for warning
>           messages (a la DejaGnu). Massimiliano Mirra quickly offered up
>           stringio.rb as a solution. Nat Pryce followed with the
>           recommendation that perhaps the function being hard to test
>           meant that the design needed to be rethought. He added that the
>           object under test use a stream object to write messages to,
>           while being tested a mock object could be used, in production a
>           reference to stdout or stderr would be used.
>
>    IDE vs editor
>           Wow, holy war territory and it stayed friendly. Lots of cool
>           thoughts about IDEA, Eclipse, Emacs, and VIm. With 33 messages
>           in the thread, I'm not even going to try and summarize ... just
>           hit the link below.
>