Ruby Weekly News: 08/19/2002

   A summary of activity on the ruby-talk mailing list, brought to you
   this week by Pat Eyler.

   ANNOUNCEMENTS
   =============

   ZenWeb 2.11.0
          ZenWeb is a tool for building websites (not web pages). It
          applies a defined set of fileters to files of content (often
          flat text or lightly marked up text (think wiki)) and creted
          hierarchically navigable pages with a consistent theme and
          design.

   FXRuby-1.0.12
          Ruby bindings for the FOX GUI toolkit. Source, windows
          installers, and RPMs are available.

   ONI - Object Network Interface
          Formerly a portion of TomsLib, now a separate project, ONI is a
          YAML (Yet Another Markup Language) version of XML-RPC and SOAP.
          For now, the code is still in TomsLib, but will be made
          available separately soon.

   Where Ruby Really Sparkles
          Not software, but an announcment nonetheless. Dave Thomas'
          article on network programming with ruby is in the latest
          edition of "Linux Magazine".

   Net/Proto
          This module provides an interface to the getprotobyname(),
          getprotobynumber() and getprotoent() functions. (More cool
          stuff from Daniel Berger ... thank you sir.)

   Narf cgi library alpha release
          NARF is an attempt to create a lighter web library. It has been
          designed so that the api can be easily tested from within
          applications and so that the api is thouroughly tested
          internally.

   INTERESTING THREADS
   ===================

   Ruby Weekly News
          Just to be self-referential ... we discussed the Ruby Weekly
          News. It seems that there is some interest in how things get
          done. Holden and I briefly replied, and invited people to let
          us know if there is any news that needs to be made more
          available.

   Problems with Marshal
          Daniel Berger ran into inconsistancies when using Marshal.
          After some troublshooting it was determined that he was using
          gets/puts to pass data to/from sockets, thus missing some of
          the data. Using #read and #write was recommended. (Hugh Sasse
          recommended packing the data into base64 for transmission and
          provided sample code to do so.)

   A few newbie questions...
          Christopher asked about RubyWin and other windows specific
          bits, then asked for tips getting started with ruby in general.

          Patrick Bennet answered that RubyWin is an MDI app to
          protoytpe/test Ruby. It allows you to type in code, execute it,
          tweak it, ad infinitum. For the beginner, he recommended the
          Pickaxe. Some discussion followed about the online version of
          the book. I liked Tim Hunter's comment 'the online version ...
          is most useful as a supplement to a printed copy. ... buy the
          book and consider it an investment...'. _The_Ruby_Way_ was
          suggested as the second book you should buy.

   Second Sydney Ruby users group meeting
          The Sydney (.au) users group met on the 15th of August in the
          Woolloomooloo Bay Hotel. (Even if I didn't think users groups
          rock, I'd have included this tidbit just so I could type that
          name!) From here on out they'll be meeting on the third
          Thursday of the month. If you've got travel plans to Sydney,
          make a note.

   Thought Question: Where does "new" come from?
          Hal Fulton put the question, and was immediately answered by
          Matz. The discussion took off from there. I can't summarize it,
          so you'd better go and read it yourself.

   Using Test::Unit to assert messages appeared on $stdout/$stderr
          Jeff Gray wondered about using Test::Unit to check for warning
          messages (a la DejaGnu). Massimiliano Mirra quickly offered up
          stringio.rb as a solution. Nat Pryce followed with the
          recommendation that perhaps the function being hard to test
          meant that the design needed to be rethought. He added that the
          object under test use a stream object to write messages to,
          while being tested a mock object could be used, in production a
          reference to stdout or stderr would be used.

   IDE vs editor
          Wow, holy war territory and it stayed friendly. Lots of cool
          thoughts about IDEA, Eclipse, Emacs, and VIm. With 33 messages
          in the thread, I'm not even going to try and summarize ... just
          hit the link below.