The world rejoiced as Michael Campbell <michael_s_campbell / yahoo.com> wrote:
> This is going to sound like an odd question, and there's no "right"
> or "wrong" answer, but when you read code, what does the iterator
> "sound" like in your head as you read?
>
> Meaning, given:
>
> a = [1, 2, 3]
> a.each {|x| p x }  # <- this line
>
> How do you read the "this line" line?  My brain wants to say "with"
> or "using" for x, so I tend to translate it as "a each with x, print
> x", or "a each using x, print x".  Or do you just say "a each x,
> print x"?
>
> Ok, I'm babbling.

"for each x in a, print x".

It's marginally too bad that we can't have something looking more
like:

  \[ \prod_{\forall x \in a} {Print x} \]
-- 
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