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On Mar 26, 2017, 12:46 -0700, Olasunkanmi Bakare <jibomaxx / hotmail.com>, wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I have being this burden of relishing above the impediments posed by Windows 10. To be more specific, the most recent stable version of Ruby(2.4.*), it's interpreter won't work...Does anyone have an idea on easing this burden while maintaining the same operating system...
> I'm aware a lot of folks bask in the realm of Linux/Unix & am not Linuxguy
>
> Sent from my Windows Phone
> From: Samuel Williams (mailto:space.ship.traveller / gmail.com)
> Sent: 26/03/2017 10:47
> To: phil / pricom.com.au (mailto:phil / pricom.com.au)
> Cc: Ruby users (mailto:ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org)
> Subject: Re: [ANN] Utopia - a rack based web framework
>
> Hi Philip,
>
> Not only is Utopia suitable, but it would be a great platform for your
> project. I'm not biased at all :p
>
> In particular, Utopia was built with the idea of making discrete
> distributable web applications. An example of this would be
> https://github.com/ioquatix/financier which is a small business
> management system/invoicing system. Keep in mind that code is using
> utopia 1.x so there are some minor differences in the actual code to
> be aware of if you were using it as a reference at this time. It will
> be updated soon though.
>
> Additionally, Utopia doesn't include any business logic/model
> framework like Rails does with ActiveRecord (although you could and we
> do in some production deployments use Utopia with ActiveRecord). This
> reduces the surface area of the framework and keeps it focused. You
> can drop in some specific model e.g.
> https://github.com/ktheory/maildir or perhaps talk directly to the
> server using IMAP (e.g.
> http://www.ombulabs.com/blog/ruby/imap/a-comprehensive-guide-to-interacting-with-imap-using-ruby.html).
> If you used IMAP, you probably wouldn't need any specific database or
> in-memory representation.
>
> I think it's a good idea. Using Utopia would be sensible. But, there
> would also be other frameworks that would make sense. Hanami is
> growing in popularity, Sinatra is another good one. I think the one
> difference is that I've tried to make Utopia as internally consistent
> and opinionated as possible, within the bounds of what I see as being
> the fundamental/necessary building blocks of a web application.
> Additionally, all these building blocks within Utopia are exposed at a
> high level using Rack middleware. If something in Utopia doesn't suit
> your taste, you can replace it. The boundaries between the various
> middleware are well defined within Utopia. Rack is the common
> foundation on which Utopia builds, but this isn't so much the case
> with other web frameworks, including Rails, Hanami and Sinatra. I
> think using Rack as the foundation has helped ensure that Utopia
> middleware has clean internal boundaries.
>
> I actually have a small server platform which manages Dovecot/Postfix
> for my own personal mail server, written in Utopia. It's primarily
> focused around provisioning new accounts, and server management,
> rather than access to email. I'd be happy to make that available.
> While it's a bit tangential to what you are doing, it might give you
> some ideas.
>
> However, where I'd be exited to be involved, is having a really light
> weight web app that would be used for accessing email. A lot of the
> existing options I've seen are pretty heavy, so I avoided going down
> that route. I could definitely see myself installing that on my mail
> server, or merging that code base into my existing server management
> platform.
>
> Kind regards,
> Samuel
>
>
>
>
>
> On 26 March 2017 at 20:16, Philip Rhoades <phil / pricom.com.au> wrote:> > Samuel,
> >
> >
> >
> > On 2017-03-26 14:44, Samuel Williams wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi Everyone,
> >>
> >> I've just released the next major version of Utopia, source available
> >> at https://github.com/ioquatix/utopia
> >>
> >> It's a content-centric web framework for Ruby. It's fast (native ragel
> >> parsers) multi-threaded (concurrent-ruby for internal caches,
> >> rack-freeze for safety) and it's used in production for several years
> >> now. It's semantically close to being what I'd consider my ideal web> >> framework for content-centric websites and applications.
> >>
> >> I'd love to have (good and constructive) feedback about Utopia.
> >> Additionally, I've waited until 2.x to announce the framework, because
> >> during 1.x there were a lot of churn (by design). Feel free to askany
> >> questions and if you choose to use Utopia for your next project let me
> >> know! If you try it out and it's not what you expect, feel free tohit
> >> me up, I'll be interested to understand your use case, and perhaps
> >> improve the documentation.
> >>
> >> Kind regards,
> >> Samuel
> >>
> >> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request / ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
> >> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
> >
> >
> >
> > I posted this on the Rails list recently but got no response: "Really simple
> > Webmail client - sensible on Rails?" - I am wondering if Utopia might be a
> > worth investigating for the job? So far I have a working, basic Rails page
> > simply printing IMAP IDs and Subjects for the INBOX . .
> >
> > The background in that post was:
> >
> > I run a RoundCubeMail Webmail server on Fedora 25 x86_64 and thisworks out
> > very nicely for me wherever I am using a desktop computer with large screen
> > as a client but the Android RoundCubeMail app is terrible and other mail
> > apps are no good for various reasons. I am think of building a really> > simple, server-based, Webmail client - just to read mail in the INBOX> > initially - and if that works out OK - enhancing the client to:
> >
> > - read other Maildir folders
> >
> > then:
> >
> > - add a reply / forward mail option
> >
> > then:
> >
> > - add other features in priority order
> >
> > I was thinking the display of messages would be really simple page listing
> > of the mails on the web page where I could open individual mails for
> > reading.
> >
> > Also, that some RAM-based DB could be used for storing the messages (read
> > from the Maildir folder) - which would just disappear on logout or get
> > recreated on changing folders.
> >
> > Do people think this viable / worth doing? Is there a simpler solution? If
> > it is worth doing, I would just put the code up on GitLab to try and get
> > some other people interested in further development.
> >
> > What do you think? - is Utopia a sensible option?
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > Phil.
> > --
> > Philip Rhoades
> >
> > PO Box 896
> > Cowra NSW 2794
> > Australia
> > E-mail: phil / pricom.com.au
>
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