I agree with Martin on Tk, it is a fine set of tools BUT the =

documentation is poor, and it is most certainly NOT user friendly.

Shoes is a very nice set of GUI tools/routines, but, IMHO, is likely to =

be a little simplistic for full blown projects.

I have no experience of GTK, at least not as a programmer, although do =

know it is widely used for building "proper" applications, mainly within =

the Unix/Linux community. (see The Gimp for example)

Like Martin, I too would tend to use a true compiled language for =

Windows based applications, but am currently seeking an alternative to =

Borland's Delphi which does the job fine, BUT will not co-operate with =

Windows 10. Sadly, this seems to apply in part to both Ruby and Python!!!


On 12/03/2017 17:50, Marvin G=FClker wrote:
>> 1) Tk bindings, i have see that it might be a little difficult to find
>> proper documentation.
> Beware Tk is not in the stdlib anymore for new versions of Ruby,
> otherwise this is a fine choice if you know how to resolve the "looks
> lik Win95" problem on Windows 8 and earlier (it is possible, just don't
> ask me how). Win10 should be fine as it turns on visual styles always.
>
>> 2) GTK2 bindings,
> These are well-maintained, and well-documented, and
> cross-platform. Probably your best choice. On Windows, you need to ship
> it as a DLL, though, as it's not native.
>
>> 3) Fox GUI,
> Not developed anymore since years, do not use.
>
>> 4) Visual ruby ( GTK2 bindings also? correct me if I'm wrong ).
> Windows-only, does not fit your requirements.
>
>> 5) Shoes toolkit,
> Not canonical Ruby, but some extra tools on top of Ruby. I cannot really
> comment on that.
>
> If you feel like contributing to a Ruby project, try Hanmac's rwx, which
> is an unfinished binding to wxWidgets: https://github.com/hanmac/rwx
>
>> what is considered to be the "standard" to use in the ruby world? I have
>> some experience with the Fox toolkit, but i really don't know.
> Ruby and GUI, especially on Windows, is a big problem as basically
> nobody uses that combination. Ruby is mostly used on Unix server
> systems, so there is no "standard" for GUI development at all.
>
>> What will you use on a newly designed application?
> C++ with GTK, wxWidgets or Qt. Ruby is a nice language, but alone the
> problem that there is no Ruby installation easily available on Windows
> is going to cause problems, even if there is Ocra. I always use a
> compiled language if I need to target Windows. If you really want to do
> it in Ruby, I suggest to use GTK (i.e. the ruby-gnome project via the
> gtk* gem family): http://ruby-gnome2.osdn.jp/
>
> Greetings
> Marvin
>

-- =

Good luck in your quest,
Patrick Bayford


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