On 2002.07.06, Tom Sawyer <transami / transami.net> wrote:
> okay, i grant you i write code very differently then most others. at
> least that has been my experience. i gerneally tend to hack something
> out and then go over it and over and over it again trying to reduce
> every little ounce of code reuse out of it that i can. i think if you
> saw some on my work you'd be very suprised at how little code there is
> and yet how much it does. so, when you appoach things in this way and
> you have a class inheritiing a class inherting a class and so on and
> those classes create other classes, to seperate logic from interface,
> for example, it has been my experience that child classes need to "talk"
> to their parents.
> 
> i can provide some examples, but it won't be a tiny piece of code to
> easily paste in an email.

Dosen't sound like it's reduced very far.

> and i think Michael, here, makes a good point: "I've passed self
> before, but I can't ever remember thinking it was a good idea."

And I asked:  Do people never use the Visitor pattern?

> that's really where i'm coming from too. for i don't feel comfortable
> with passing self really. so either i'm not writing my code in the best
> manner or there really is a good reason to have this connection between
> the container and contained. adn yet i've i gone over some of my code
> angain and again. i it always seems the most effective means: passing
> self.
> 
> perhaps i should just feel comfortable with passing self. that's fine.
> i'm not trying to push this or anything. i was curious to see what
> others thought. really, this conversation has me wondering what others
> might thing of my code.

I know two things:

1)  Inheriting methods from your parent is good.

2)  Needing to know what the class of your parent is a coding smell.
Especially if you are using multiple inheritance.

-- Dossy

-- 
Dossy Shiobara                       mail: dossy / panoptic.com 
Panoptic Computer Network             web: http://www.panoptic.com/ 
  "He realized the fastest way to change is to laugh at your own
    folly -- then you can let go and quickly move on." (p. 70)