Thread name: "Re: mail library in ruby" 
Mail number: 14 
Date: Wed, Dec 10, 2014 
In reply to: Abinoam Jr. 
>
> Hi Lzaro Armando,
> 
> Pretty good point you have brought.
> 
> But, I'm not completly understanding it. Could you clarify it to me?

Thats could be a solution, but the main problem is that many, a LOT of
person here, have NOT any kind of internet access. So, I must carry on
the repo and give it via USB pendrive. But that is not a solution,
because almost all thats persons; live in inners "provinces" inside
the country; an USB pendrive is expensive, so is not the kind of thing
that you send via postal service. I was trying to write a command for
gem, that ask for the gem via email, then, a program at my computer,
get that mail and send the gem to the person; but this also fail, some
gem are to big.

Any idea?

Can you tell me more about modular Rubies? How could I make a custom
modular ruby?


> If bandwidth is expensive, a modular Ruby would allow you to download
> _only_ what want.
> So it would be "cheaper". Wouldn't it?
> 
> But, perhaps the problem is about 24h conectivity.
> 
> Does the people have to download everything they can at once and them
> "disconnect" to work off-line?
> If so, I would understand why you prefer the "one download with all
> bundled" way.
> 
> I remember when Ubuntu was released for the first time, they
> distributed CDs for free.
> Perhaps somebody could run some project to distribute all-in-one CDs
> for places where bandwidth is expensive?
> After installing from CD, people would have only to care about
> updating the gems if necessary.
> 
> Would something like this help?
> 
> Best regards,
> Abinoam Jr.
> 
> On Tue, Dec 9, 2014 at 1:25 PM, Lzaro Armando <lazaro / hcg.sld.cu> wrote:
> > Thread name: "Re: mail library in ruby"
> > Mail number: 12
> > Date: Tue, Dec 09, 2014
> > In reply to: Bryce Kerley
> >>
> >> On Tue, Dec 9, 2014 at 10:36 AM, Lzaro Armando <lazaro / hcg.sld.cu> wrote:
> >>
> >> >
> >> > Many newb programmers (ruby users) value the lang by its standard
> >> > library. In countries like this, where internet is lucrative, use gem
> >> > is not a option, but, thats is not a problem. Many times, I told to
> >> > people (super developed countries people); for example "with ruby,
> >> > just like it, you can do that".
> >>
> >>
> >> Is there a case for a "batteries included" distribution of Ruby that ships
> >> with a larger set of gems, i.e. mail, nokogiri, (maybe?) activesupport, so
> >> that you can get a more useful library in a single download/session atthe
> >> cost of download size and storage space, while allowing others to just
> >> download the core ruby, and being able to grab that functionality fromgems
> >> when necessary?
> >
> > Yep, my "windowsist off-lines comrades" ask my to download
> > railsinstaller, their consider it a kind of batteries included pack.
> >
> > My question was about the ruby philosophy, I was worried about the
> > future of standard library and as seed, it will be dismantled.
> >
> > My question is answered and this thread is becoming a bit weird, lets
> > finish it here...
> >