Hal Fulton <rubyhacker / gmail.com> wrote:
> I admit it: I have a hard time blogging. I've been trying to start again.

Heh, I find it far easier to reply to people than start my own
topics.  So I don't blog, but rather spend my time on mailing lists :)

For some Ruby projects (e.g. unicorn)[1], I've worked on making the
mailing list web archives more blog-like.  However, my initial focus was
never a web UI, but a neutral git-based repository format (mechanism)
which allows export to mbox/Maildir/IMAP:

    http://ssoma.public-inbox.org/ssoma_repository.txt

The rest of public-inbox is a highly-opinionated policy on top of
ssoma (anti-spam, HTML removal, web UI): http://public-inbox.org/README

> Here are some of my contraints:
> 
> 1. Obviously if it's in Ruby, that's a plus. I get to hack the code.

ssoma and public-inbox are Perl[2], so close enough, I hope :)
In any case, the repository format (not the code) is the crux and
could be re-implemented in anything.  A Ruby implementation would
be great!

> 2. If it at least can handle plugins in Ruby, that's nice, too.
> 3. I want comments, so no static solution.
> 4. I want to host it all myself, so no 3rd-party hosting.
> 5. Likewise no 3rd-party tools such as Disqus.

Right, as implemented today, blog comments seem to be an afterthought.
On a mailing list, there's no distinction :)
Furthermore, email has many great anti-spam solutions.

> 6. Call me crazy, but markdown doesn't thrill me. I'd like options.
> 7. Obviously geek-friendly features are a plus -- easy code fragment
>     insertion, syntax highlighting, maybe integration with git/gist, etc.

I prefer pre-formatted plain-text all the way as it's the lowest common
denominator.  Reading mail in a good mail client allows me to configure
highlighting, spawn any editor/pager, or even shell out to things like
"git am" to apply patches

Allowing formatting/hrefs would make it too easy a target for phishers
and spammers (because posters have no special privileges over each other).

> 8. Ease of use is very nice, but power and flexibility are more important.

Right, which is why I focus on the data format, first.

I've kept everything in ssoma + public-inbox installable and usable
without requiring dependencies outside of Debian stable (currently
wheezy).  However, I am a reasonably experienced mail server admin.

> 9. If I can work at the command line and publish easily, that's a plus
>     (though I don't like Octopress because of Disqus).

All posts are sent via email to a public-inbox address.
No registration, no mailing list subscription required, anybody can post.
I also just enabled the submission port (587) to help folks behind
firewalls.

Training spam is integrated via inotify on my server[3]:  Saving any
spam messages from my inbox to my spam folder automatically deletes it
from the git tree (it remains in git history), so it will no longer
appear in the web UI.

I also targeted the public-inbox web UI for lynx and w3m users :)

> So -- recommendations welcome!  :)  Reply here and/or email me.
> 
> As I write this, I am considering in the back of my mind creating my own
> blogging platform for the Nth time, for some large value of N.
>
> Feel free either to volunteer to help me write it, or slap me until I get
> over the urge.  :)

I'd be absolutely thrilled to have alternative Ruby UIs available based
on the ssoma repository format.  I'll be glad to help out if it doesn't
require user login/registration or a GUI to contribute, just email :)

[1] http://bogomips.org/unicorn-public/ - the primary unicorn WWW URL
    for mail archives, subject to much bikeshedding :)
    unicorn-public / bogomips.org

    I also started http://80x24.org/misc/ for miscellaneous topics.
    which anybody can send plain-text posts to: misc / 80x24.org
    I decided the patch spew in misc probably deserved a better
    home, so I moved it to http://80x24.org/spew/ (spew / 80x24.org)

[2] Why I chose Perl for public-inbox + ssoma in 2013:
    I've been using Perl for all my mail needs since before I knew about
    Ruby, so I have much experience with those libs.  I've also been
    contributing Perl code to git using email since 2005, so git, email,
    Perl were all natural fits for me.  ...And I consider code secondary
    to data.

[3] http://public-inbox.org/dc-dlvr-spam-flow.txt

[4] http://bogomips.org/unicorn-public/?r=9858b3756eba2534