The key word in that idea is "archive". Having a searchable archive has
proven distinctly useful to me (and surely to others as well) on more than
one occasion. It is difficult for me to imagine what objection anyone might
have to such an archive.

However, NOT having all primary questions and discussions go to a mailing
list folder in my inbox seems to discourage promotion of an actively
engaged community.

It is interesting to note that this mailing list/forum question, when the
subject is an entire operating system, seems (in my experience) to be
resolved in favor of a forum-primary solution, perhaps because the
questions tend to be so highly technical (and so not of broad interest) and
because there are multiple versions of the OS involved. (I'm thinking of
the Ubuntu/Kubuntu, etc. forums). But even then there is the option to be
notified of responses to a thread, so that continued involvement is easy.

What is NOT easy, however, is to see what people in general are talking
about today. For that, one must browse to the forum, then sign in, then
click a while, etc. That effort-barrier simply discourage involvement, to
my mind.

So, I check in on the Ruby community discussion fairly often. I never go to
the Kubuntu forum unless I need something. That's a huge difference.

Tom


On Sat, Aug 9, 2014 at 9:49 AM, Yukihiro Matsumoto <matz / ruby.or.jp> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> In message "Re: Are we dying?"
>     on Sat, 9 Aug 2014 08:48:10 +1000, Sam Saffron <sam.saffron / gmail.com>
> writes:
>
> |I wonder if anyone here would refuse to have the content mirrored in a web
> |forum? That is a concern I can not really address.
>
> The mailing lists have been archived in our server from the beginning,
> so I expect no one would complain about mirroring.  For your
> information, I have received very few removal requests in last 15+
> years of mailing lists history.
>
>                                                         matz.
>