On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 5:18 PM, Robert Klemme <shortcutter / googlemail.com>
wrote:

> On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 10:32 PM, Stu <stu / rubyprogrammer.net> wrote:
>
> > Having a centralized area for user contrib tutorials for both
> clarification
> > and education, user code commits to further enhance the site as well as
> > getting back to the basics of mentoring from older community members to
> aid
> > noobies to both ruby and programming.
>
> Only that the "centralized area" part won't work - the web just has
> too many places.  I mean, it's unlikely to be able to deliberately
> make a site central - either it happens because users are flowing that
> way, or it doesn't.
>

It was an idealistic statement. I figured if the forum was going to be
sunsetted for one reason or another that one possible future ruby-talk
feature could be a place for community driven edification(maybe like
user-owned wikis with user level trust to allow their friends editing
rights or commit bits, if you will). Seems like many of the sites that did
this died out or where displaced by SO. Voting systems (like SO) seem more
for just getting an answer than grokking the programming paradigms. I would
also recommend a pastebin style feature even though there are many such
sites and tools out there already.

On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 4:04 PM, Eric Wong <normalperson / yhbt.net> wrote:
> quintus / quintilianus.eu wrote:
> > I have no incentives to always run over to some web forum, and generally
> > find mailinglists easier to use. It may also be that occasionally I am
> > too lazy to start X and just use text mode, which generally plays not
> > really well with highly designed websites. Having several different
> > communities united by a single interface in my mail client is just
> > superior to logging into a thousand different web forums which are
> > designed one way or another with or without similarities.
>
> Right on.  I couldn't figure out a way to subscribe via email-only
> commands to meta or try.discourse.org, nor could I find a way to
> subscribe on the website with the text-only lynx browser.
>
> Using Ruby does not require a GUI, so discussing Ruby should not require
> a GUI.  Heck, discussing anything using text should never require a GUI.
>
> That said, reading old archives of newly-discovered lists is a pain for
> many mailing lists.  Gmane is great, but NNTP is slow to sync for
> offline reading.
>
> ssoma + public-inbox[1] seems OK for the some Ruby projects I run; it
> stores messages in git, and allows extracting messages to any
> mbox/Maildir/IMAP location as well as feeding mlmmj lists.
>
>
> [1] http://public-inbox.org/ + http://ssoma.public-inbox.org/
>

Maybe this: https://github.com/matz/mail
vi/mutt or emacs/cmail nano/pico/pine/(re)alpine etc. I agree it's a huge
user base that would be abandoned by being only assessable via graphical
browser only. Mapping out and reducing the digital divide would be
imperative. I'm not sold on discourse either. It's main selling point is
that it is optimized for search engines and has that twitter bootstrap js
mobile theme. I am curious how discourse mailing lists feature stands up to
the tried and true methods. I don't believe ruby-talk forums/usenet/ML ever
really had a problem with being crawled so it's a redundancy. Worse case we
could fork discourse and strip it of any limitations and implement what's
missing by using ruby at what it's best at: molding the language to the
problem domain (which in the case is the ruby community needs).

Stu