Ryan,

On Wednesday 23 July 2014, 12:10:35, Ryan Davis wrote:
> You didn't read any of his explanation. He clearly explains how and why this
> happens. It has nothing to do with zsh. A simple grep will show that it is
> ruby:
> 
> % grep -C5 "Insecure world writable dir" file.c
> 	if (STAT(p0, &st) == 0 && S_ISDIR(st.st_mode) && (st.st_mode & S_IWOTH)
> #ifdef S_ISVTX
> 	    && !(p && execpath && (st.st_mode & S_ISVTX))
> #endif
> 	    && !access(p0, W_OK)) {
> 	    rb_warn("Insecure world writable dir %s in %sPATH, mode 0%"
> 		    PRI_MODET_PREFIX"o",
> 		    p0, (execpath ? "" : "LOAD_"), st.st_mode);
> 	    if (p) *p = '/';
> 	    RB_GC_GUARD(path);
> 	    return 0;

thanks for highlighting the source code.

I stumpled upon the very same warning emitted by zsh just some days ago, so 
that was the reason for my assumption.

I did read Jon Hart's explanation. You'll notice that his code examples 
include these lines:

```
$ cat test1
#!/usr/bin/env ruby

system('date')
```

Which would invoke the default shell of the caller, and if that happened to be 
zsh, it could as well have emitted the warning. Of course, I could have 
counter-checked Ruby's source code, which I obviously didn't. Mea culpa.

				--- Eric