I think that D also has something like DBC as part of the language.


On 22 July 2014 08:54, Adam Wenham <adamwenham64 / gmail.com> wrote:

> Thanks Daniel. Same questions to you :)
>
>
> On 22 July 2014 08:50, Adam Wenham <adamwenham64 / gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Thanks Ryan. So it seems old, and not particularly widespread these days.
>> Is the technique still relevant? Or just a stepping stone on the way to
>> better TDD and BDD tools and techniques? The Wikipedia page says that it's
>> there to augment unit and integration testing, but is it really necessary
>> in creating robust software? Does it fill a niche that actually needs to be
>> filled?
>>
>>
>> On 22 July 2014 08:30, Ryan Davis <ryand-ruby / zenspider.com> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> On Jul 22, 2014, at 0:12, Adam Wenham <adamwenham64 / gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> > Hi all,
>>> >
>>> > I'm been reading The Pragmatic Programmer and have come across the
>>> concept of 'Design by Contract' (
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_by_contract), which is a concept I
>>> haven't come across before.
>>> >
>>> > It seems like quite a useful technique, so I was wondering what all of
>>> your thoughts were on the technique in general, and also the benefits,
>>> drawbacks and alternatives to it's application in Ruby programming
>>> specifically.
>>>
>>> I played with it back in the day when I was evaluating eiffel (DBC was
>>> first popularized by Bertrand Meyer, designer of the eiffel language). I
>>> know there was at least one library back in the day for DBC in ruby, but
>>> I've never used any of them. You might want to check this one out:
>>>
>>> https://rubygems.org/gems/dbc
>>>
>>> It's old, but I doubt that matters for this topic.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> == If you're doing it alone, you're probably doing it wrong ==
>>
>
>
>
> --
> == If you're doing it alone, you're probably doing it wrong ==
>