Thanks Ryan. So it seems old, and not particularly widespread these days.
Is the technique still relevant? Or just a stepping stone on the way to
better TDD and BDD tools and techniques? The Wikipedia page says that it's
there to augment unit and integration testing, but is it really necessary
in creating robust software? Does it fill a niche that actually needs to be
filled?


On 22 July 2014 08:30, Ryan Davis <ryand-ruby / zenspider.com> wrote:

>
> On Jul 22, 2014, at 0:12, Adam Wenham <adamwenham64 / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> > I'm been reading The Pragmatic Programmer and have come across the
> concept of 'Design by Contract' (
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_by_contract), which is a concept I
> haven't come across before.
> >
> > It seems like quite a useful technique, so I was wondering what all of
> your thoughts were on the technique in general, and also the benefits,
> drawbacks and alternatives to it's application in Ruby programming
> specifically.
>
> I played with it back in the day when I was evaluating eiffel (DBC was
> first popularized by Bertrand Meyer, designer of the eiffel language). I
> know there was at least one library back in the day for DBC in ruby, but
> I've never used any of them. You might want to check this one out:
>
> https://rubygems.org/gems/dbc
>
> It's old, but I doubt that matters for this topic.
>
>


-- 
== If you're doing it alone, you're probably doing it wrong ==